Clinical Techniques of Invertebrates

      As technology and knowledge grow in veterinary medicine, so too does the number of species to which the veterinarian has a responsibility to attend. Invertebrates have been ignored to some extent by veterinary medicine, although they constitute almost 90% of the animal kingdom [
      • Cooper J.E.
      Emergency care of invertebrates.
      ,
      • Cooper J.E.
      Invertebrate care.
      ]. Dissemination of appropriate techniques for treating these creatures is necessary based on the increased interest in ownership of invertebrate exotic pets and the resultant demand for veterinary care. These animals offer advantages in our increasingly mobile society, whose members also live in smaller quarters. Invertebrates have relatively short lifespans, can be interactive, and require minimal but specific care. Invertebrates have the advantages of small size and portable habitats, while still being interesting and novel when compared with more conventional mammalian and avian pets. Producers of invertebrate products should also have adequate care available to their invertebrate “herds,” just as services are provided for other production animals, such as cattle, swine, or poultry. Efficient production of goods such as honey and silk depends on healthy, cohesive colonies and healthy individuals. The veterinarian has an obligation to know current clinical techniques for this economically important class of animals.
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